Teachers have a high chance of experiencing LGBT discrimination

Even though there have been several changes to California laws to ensure more protection from discrimination for LGBT workers over the years, not all workplaces have adapted to the new regulations comfortably. Some employers are still old fashioned while others don’t know how to respond to employee mistreatment accusations.

While a worker’s sexual orientation shouldn’t affect their careers, educators have drastically different work environments. Unfortunately, many of their employers see their sexual orientations or their efforts to teach children about the LGBT community as harmful and end up mistreating them in the process.

Skeptical on support

More students are beginning to discover their sexual orientations while attending school. Unfortunately, the amount of bullying against these students hasn’t slowed down. While teachers try their best to minimize bullying on school property, some districts have limits on how much they can involve themselves with interfering.

For example, a former English teacher at a high school in Sultana was fired shortly after helping her school’s Gay-Straight Alliance club bring in the ACLU to help with an ongoing discrimination problem they were dealing with. After a five-year court battle, the district eventually agreed to pay the teacher a settlement worth $850,000.

Religious problems

You often hear most LGBT problems at schools that place a high focus on their religious values. Despite the legalization of gay marriage in every state, there are still several religious schools that fire staff after they find out about a teacher’s sexual orientation. Many cite that marrying someone of the same gender goes against their school’s policies or the contract that the teacher initially signed.

Last year, a gay former teacher at a Catholic high school in Glendora reached a settlement with his former employers after five years in court. In 2013, the school fired him after he married his partner. Despite the school’s attorneys arguing that they had a “ministerial exception,” the judge denied their motion to dismiss because the teacher was not a part of the religious department and the school knew about his partner before their marriage.

These types of cases are often difficult to deal with given how religious schools vary in their acceptance of the LGBT community. To prepare for this tough battle, you need an attorney with experience helping clients that face discrimination at work. You shouldn’t lose your job over loving someone of the same gender.

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